Fascism Rising
September 19, 1951 — The Lethbridge Herald

Arash Norouzi
The Mossadegh Project
| May 21, 2015    


“Only the removal of Premier Mossadegh and the violently anti-British element which supports him will save Iran.”

If Mossadegh remained in power, argued The Lethbridge Herald of Alberta, Canada, Iran might soon be goose stepping like those iconic European fascists.

After the newspaper got their wish in 1953, they penned a vengeful editorial, No Pity For Mossadegh, urging the public hanging of the fallen Prime Minister.

Fascism would triumph in Iran after all, however, as the succeeding U.S.-backed military dictatorship gripped the country for the next quarter century.




Mossadegh’s Troubles

Premier Mohammed Mossadegh of Iran is having internal as well as external troubles. Not only is Great Britain applying economic and political pressure from without, but various factions within are doing their best to upset the Mossadegh applecart. Some of his cabinet ministers object to his desire to be tough with Britain regardless of economic consequences, while others feel that he is not going far enough. The upshot is that he is getting rid of those who do not agree with his get-tough policy in an attempt to appease those who feel he is not hard-boiled enough.

Nationalism is certainly a funny thing at times. There is no telling where it will take a country. Under Hitler, for instance, Germany went to the dogs after a period of great success. Italy, too, had its day. Both countries were stricken with a very violent type of nationalism which eventually proved their undoing. To a lesser extent, Iran is suffering from the same disease. She, too, will succumb if it is allowed to run its course. Only the removal of Premier Mossadegh and the violently anti-British element which supports him will save Iran.

Iranian nationalism is no different from the German and Italian nationalism which helped bring about the last great war. There is a difference in its effect, however, because Iran is a much less powerful country than the other two and therefore cannot conceivably cause the same amount of trouble; at least, not without outside assistance.

ORIGINAL SIN: The 1953 Coup in Iran Clarified | by Arash Norouzi
ORIGINAL SIN: The 1953 Coup in Iran Clarified | by Arash Norouzi





Related links:

Mossadegh Acts Like A MadmanThe Times Record, October 2, 1951

End in Iran?...America Has a Lot At Stake in IranThe Cortland Standard, June 22, 1951

Dictatorship Replaces Monarchy in Little Iran — U.S. Editorial, August 18, 1953



MOSSADEGH t-shirts — “If I sit silently, I have sinned”

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