"Young Shah Strikes Blow At Kremlin"
October 12, 1955 — United Press [UPI]

The Mossadegh Project | April 8, 2014      


An extremely pro-Shah article by United Press correspondent Charles M. McCann, who always despised Mossadegh. Alternate headlines included:

Iran’s Shah Deals Hard Blow To Russia
Courageous Shah Snubs Soviet Offers
Iran's Democratic Shah In Big Blow To Kremlin
Young Shah of Iran Provides Soviet Setback
Iran's Young Shah Gives Kremlin Quite A Setback
Shah of Iran Fools Russia
Young Shah Deals Hard Blow To Kremlin By Joining West
Young Shah of Iran Defies Russia to Line Up With West
Iran's Young Shah Casts Lots With The West
Iran's Stand Blow to Reds
Shah of Iran Gives Blow to Soviets, Drops Neutrality
Shah of Iran Giving Russia Hearty Blows
Shah of Iran Deals a Blow To Red Drive
Iran's Move to Alliance Certain to Anger Russia



Blow For West At Vital Time
Handsome Shah of Iran Openly Defies Kremlin


by Charles M. McCann
United Press Staff Correspondent


Iran’s handsome, democratic young Shah has given the Kremlin quite a blow.

Just when Russia has embarked on a new campaign of penetration in the Middle East, Mohammed Reza Pahlevi has cast his country’s fortunes with the Western allies.

It took courage for the Shah to abandon Iran’s long-standing neutrality.

In doing so, he has defied Russia, Iran’s neighbor on the north, and made it plain that he puts no faith in Russian promises.

He has strengthened greatly the vast interlocking system of Allied defense treaties against Communist aggression. Iran was a missing link.

The decision was the Shah’s alone, for he now runs Iran.

He has the complete loyalty of the army, he has his most trustee friend as premier in Hussein Ala and he has the complete support of his parliament.

It was only two years ago that old Mohammed Mossadegh, who had made himself dictator as premier, overthrew the Shah [false] and sent him into exile.

It didn’t stick. The Shah was brought back in triumph. Mossadegh is now weeping in his cell in a Tehran prison.

In the two years since 1953, the Shah has succeeded in making himself the undisputed head man.

He prepared the way for Iran’s adherence to the West by settling the bitter dispute with the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company, after Mossadegh nationalized it.

Now he has taken what for his country is a historic step.

The news that has come from Tehran was foreshadowed late in September when President Celal Bayar of Turkey paid a state visit to Mohammed and Ala.

Ala announced in parliament Sept. 20 that “We must take steps for closer cooperation with our friends.” He ridiculed the idea that Iran could remain neutral.

“Only those who aim to devour us can want us to be unprepared and weak”, he said. He meant Russia.

The Shah followed this up, in almost the same words, in a speech to the senate last Saturday.

The Shah, who will be 36 Oct. 16, has shown his courage. He is quiet, unassuming and friendly. He is trying to improve his country’s living standard, and has set an example by starting to break up his own vast estates and give them to peasants.

He became Shah in 1941, at 21, when his father abdicated. He was driving through Teheran on Feb. 4, 1949, when an assassin fired six shots at him at close range. Every bullet but one passed through his helmet or his uniform. The remaining one went through his upper lip. He remained as outwardly calm as if the bullets had been blanks.

With a loyal country, happy with a strikingly beautiful wife, the Shah is a lucky man. The West is lucky to have him as an ally.




Related links:

"Powerful Religious Leader Threatens Rebellion in Iran" — UPI, February 3, 1954

Shah Outlaws Bahai Faith in Iran — The Times Record, June 20, 1955

Iran To Russia: “Hands Off!”" — The Lockport Union-Sun & Journal, July 28, 1954



MOSSADEGH t-shirts — “If I sit silently, I have sinned”

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