Army Surplus
April 15, 1953 — The Jamestown Post-Journal

The Mossadegh Project | November 17, 2015      


One of the many No’he Esfand postgame wrap-ups, this one from The Jamestown Post-Journal newspaper in New York state.

For some strange reason, they seemed to have full faith in the integrity and abilities of Iran’s young monarch, but absolutely no regard for its popular, world-renowned Prime Minister. Some might call this bias...





Iran Army True to Shah

Because the King and his whole government were corrupt, General Naguib [Muhammad Naguib] and his officers deposed the King [King Farouk] and gave Egypt a military government which, despite opposition from beneficiaries of the former state of affairs, seems to be firmly in power and, according to latest reports, likely to remain in power. [Naguib lasted a total of 17 months before being removed, and, mirroring Mossadegh’s fate, served 18 years under house arrest] There has been nothing to indicate that Naguib acted because of any personal desire for power; he was moved by patriotic motives.

Most recent reports from Tehran, however, seem to make it apparent that Premier Mossadegh cherishes dictatorship ambitions, to be fulfilled by depriving Iran’s Shah of control of any government agency, which would include the army and the security forces. A group of army officers [mostly retired, purged and disgruntled officers and not necessarily in active duty] has acted swiftly to place themselves on Shah Pahlevi’s side. [Mohammad Reza Pahlavi] They issued a statement announcing their determination “to leave our service and together rise” if the Premier and his “criminal collaborators” do not cease “their impertinent activities.”

Mossadegh, described in the officers statement as a “foxy, stubborn old man,” has submitted a bill to the Majlis to carry out his plan. For lack of a quorum the decisive meeting has been postponed until Thursday. Reports available do not predict what action the parliament will take.

Crowds are defying a ban on demonstrations. They include adherents of both sides. A disturbing feature of the situation is that the Tudeh (Communist) party supports Mossadegh. [Not quite] The declaration by the army officers said that nation was now “in the hands of foreign agents,” meaning Tudeh. Mossadegh is plainly playing with fire. A population divided between ruler and men seeking to end his power would be an inviting field for Soviet Russia.




Related links:

New Complications In IranThe Brooklyn Eagle, April 8, 1953

Another DictatorshipThe Jamestown Post-Journal, August 19, 1953

New Peril In PersiaThe Elmira Star-Gazette, April 10, 1953



MOSSADEGH t-shirts — “If I sit silently, I have sinned”

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